Weary Pilgrim

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Location:

Mt. Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mount Hope Avenue
Rochester, NY

Material:

Marble

Date:

1882

Description Aaron Erickson's tomb by Nicola Cantalamessa-Papotti
Other References "Nicola Cantalamessa-Papotti (1833-1910) The Erickson monument, "The Weary Pilgrim," and the Ellwanger monument with its large figure of St. John on the Isle of Patmos, often elicit questions from tour members about their sculptor. Both were done by Nicola Cantalamessa-Papotti, an Italian sculptor, who was born in Ascoli Picino, Italy, on January 31,1833. He was educated by the Paci Brothers in Ascoli, then by Pietro Teneranis, and finally at the Academy of St. Luke in Rome. Upon leaving the academy, Papotti started what was to become a long, successful career. He received a commission from Ferdinand II for "St. Emidius (Emygdius) Baptising Blessed Polidia," and also a commission from Pius IX for a relief sculpture, "St. Joseph's Dream," on the base of the column of the Immaculate Conception (Rome) in 1856-57. Papotti entered competitions, accepted both private and public commissions and designed cemetery monuments in both Europe and the United States. His works were of a religious or secular nature. In 1857, he first visited the United States, where over the years he received many commissions. One was for the memorial for President James A. Garfield. His works were displayed at the Philadelphia, Chicago and St. Louis Expositions. The Ellwanger monument was completed in 1874. It was constructed by Peter Pitkin's firm in Rochester, but the sculpture was cut in Rome by Papotti. The total cost was $4,000. Details about the Erickson monument aren't known. There are two other sculptures by Papotti in Rochester. One is the Barry monument in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, dated 1878. The other one, "Love's Mirror," dated 1875, is part of the permanent collection of the Memorial Art Gallery and is on display there. It was shown at the Philadelphia Exposition in 1876. Papotti died in Rome on August 31, 1910. (Based in part on a translation by Rev. Robert McNamara, Archivist, Diocese of Rochester, of an article in Thieme-Backe KUNSTLER LEXICON, for E. Robert Vogt, Director, Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, who made it available to the Friends)." From: Epitaph: The Friends of Mount Hope Cemetery Newsletter http://www.lib.rochester.edu/index.cfm?PAGE=3070